Discovering Saturn through Cassini’s lens

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Some months ago, I wrote in thIl y a qHace unos meses, escribí en Thil hace unos meses, escribí en este espacio un hexágono en Saturno masiva ( “Tierra, tenemos un hexágono”). Los cientíSome months ago, I wrote in ThIl and a few months ago, I wrote in Thil a few months ago, I wrote in this space a hexagon in massive Saturn (“Earth, we have a hexagon”). Scientists first observed this remarkable celestial formation in the 1980s, in the data that the Voyager spacecraft shipped home. More recently, we have seen – and learned a lot – through images taken by the Cassini spacecraft, which was launched in 1997 and has been in orbit around Saturn for 13 years.

While the hex was a find, we learned much more about Saturn Cassini through only an unexpected form to its north pole. But as I mentioned in the previous column, the small paternal space reaches the end of its fuel. Therefore, their heads at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning a one-year farewell tour of Cassini. It began last orbit around the planet in September. There are some days, carried out the first of the last maneuvers that will continue until September.

The Swansong Cassini is a series of plunged through the famous rings of Saturn, ie between the planet and the rings. The first dive began on April 26, the second on May 2, and there will be a week until September. During each dive, Cassini did what he did with such value for two decades: taking and sending images of Saturn and its surroundings. To give you an idea of what I mean, Cassini has sent about 400,000 photos since its orbit around Saturn in 2004; Almost 1,500 of them are from the first final dives.

The photographs that Cassini has sent are, as expected, spectacular. Ok, not everyone, and I say “spectacular” not because they are very well formed, but in fact because they give us a narrow vision of a world totally foreign to ours. I feel the wonder every time I see these images, every time I think about what we have learned from them.

Like the moons of Saturn. Astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to discover a Saturn in Saturn’s orbit in 1655. It was called Titan. In 1684, Giovanni Domenico Cassini (hence the name) had found four more. When modern Cassini was started in 1997, we knew that Saturn has 18 moons. Very by the niche, yes? However, in the last 20 years, this number has surpassed the 53 confirmed and still new moons are being examined. Once large litter he had suspected, and much of the credit for finding these bodies spinning around Saturn will make this spacecraft.

It’s not just the number of moons.

Hyperion was discovered in 1848, but it was not until 2005 that we realized how strange it is. It is so many crater marks with sharp edges that looks like a giant sponge (take a look at this beautiful image). Tiny polyideus, with a radius of less than 1 km, is a moon “Troy”. This means that it drags a larger moon (Dione, in this case) in its path around Saturn. Daphnis falls through the rings of Saturn, clearly blazing a map on the road, as gate books if driving a ball in a measure of flour. And Enceladus seems to have powerful giant in its south pole, producing columns of crystals of water to hundreds of kilometers in the space. Mention water, of course, and astronomers are excited because this suggests a possibility of life. Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, also reflects life. Cassini has sent a Huygens probe to Titan’s surface in 2005, and was found to be covered with lakes and rivers. Only it is not watercolors as we know them; They are filled with liquid hydrocarbons. This means that life on Titan would be significantly different from everything we know.

Yes, life on any of the moons of Saturn. Courtesy Cassini, we can at least imagine the possibility.

Diving took Cassini within 3 000 km of tops of Saturn’s clouds. If this seems a large gap, remember that given the size of Saturn, its diameter of 120 000 km, 3 000 km is small. And from this proximity, Saturn is like a hulky and pétrissante presence in the viewfinder of Cassini. Some of the blurry images show huge tub in the planet’s atmosphere. It is a storm, but on a scale difficult to understand: it is as big as our Earth. Put our own supercyclones and typhoons in place, no doubt.

When September arrives, Cassini will be ready for his final glory of fire, literally. Recovers NASAuelques mois, j’ai écrit dans cet espace a hexagone massif sur Saturne (“Earth, We Have a Hexagon”). Les scientifiques ont d’abord observed a remarkable formation in the 1980s, with t

Some months ago, I wrote in thIl y a qHace unos meses, escribí en Thil hace unos meses, escribí en este espacio un hexágono en Saturno masiva ( “Tierra, tenemos un hexágono”). Los cientíSome months ago, I wrote in ThIl and a few months ago, I wrote in Thil a few months ago, I wrote in this space a hexagon in massive Saturn (“Earth, we have a hexagon”). Scientists first observed this remarkable celestial formation in the 1980s, in the data that the Voyager spacecraft shipped home. More recently, we have seen – and learned a lot – through images taken by the Cassini spacecraft, which was launched in 1997 and has been in orbit around Saturn for 13 years.

While the hex was a find, we learned much more about Saturn Cassini through only an unexpected form to its north pole. But as I mentioned in the previous column, the small paternal space reaches the end of its fuel. Therefore, their heads at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning a one-year farewell tour of Cassini. It began last orbit around the planet in September. There are some days, carried out the first of the last maneuvers that will continue until September.

The Swansong Cassini is a series of plunged through the famous rings of Saturn, ie between the planet and the rings. The first dive began on April 26, the second on May 2, and there will be a week until September. During each dive, Cassini did what he did with such value for two decades: taking and sending images of Saturn and its surroundings. To give you an idea of what I mean, Cassini has sent about 400,000 photos since its orbit around Saturn in 2004; Almost 1,500 of them are from the first final dives.

The photographs that Cassini has sent are, as expected, spectacular. Ok, not everyone, and I say “spectacular” not because they are very well formed, but in fact because they give us a narrow vision of a world totally foreign to ours. I feel the wonder every time I see these images, every time I think about what we have learned from them.

Like the moons of Saturn. Astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to discover a Saturn in Saturn’s orbit in 1655. It was called Titan. In 1684, Giovanni Domenico Cassini (hence the name) had found four more. When modern Cassini was started in 1997, we knew that Saturn has 18 moons. Very by the niche, yes? However, in the last 20 years, this number has surpassed the 53 confirmed and still new moons are being examined. Once large litter he had suspected, and much of the credit for finding these bodies spinning around Saturn will make this spacecraft.

It’s not just the number of moons.

Hyperion was discovered in 1848, but it was not until 2005 that we realized how strange it is. It is so many crater marks with sharp edges that looks like a giant sponge (take a look at this beautiful image). Tiny polyideus, with a radius of less than 1 km, is a moon “Troy”. This means that it drags a larger moon (Dione, in this case) in its path around Saturn. Daphnis falls through the rings of Saturn, clearly blazing a map on the road, as if driving a ball in a measure of flour. And Enceladus seems to have powerful giant in its south pole, producing columns of crystals of water to hundreds of kilometers in the space. Mention water, of course, and astronomers are excited because this suggests a possibility of life. Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, also reflects life. Cassini has sent a Huygens probe to Titan’s surface in 2005, and was found to be covered with lakes and rivers. Only it is not watercolors as we know them; They are filled with liquid hydrocarbons. This means that life on Titan would be significantly different from everything we know.

Yes, life on any of the moons of Saturn. Courtesy Cassini, we can at least imagine the possibility.

Diving took Cassini within 3 000 km of tops of Saturn’s clouds. If this seems a large gap, remember that given the size of Saturn, its diameter of 120 000 km, 3 000 km is small. And from this proximity, Saturn is like a hulky and pétrissante presence in the viewfinder of Cassini. Some of the blurry images show huge tub in the planet’s atmosphere. It is a storm, but on a scale difficult to understand: it is as big as our Earth. Put our own supercyclones and typhoons in place, no doubt.

When September arrives, Cassini will be ready for his final glory of fire, literally. Recovers NASAuelques mois, j’ai écrit dans cet espace a hexagone massif sur Saturne (“Earth, We Have a Hexagon”). Les scientifiques ont d’abord observed a remarkable formation in the 1980s, with the donations of the Vaisseau spatial Voyager to envoyé à la maison. Plus récemment, nous l’avons vu – et en a appris beaucoup plus – à travers les images prisesficos observaron por primera vez este notable formación celeste en la década de 1980, en los datos que la nave espacial Voyager enviado a casa. Más recientemente, hemos visto – y aprendido mucho – a través de imágenes tomadas por la nave espacial Cassini, que fue lanzado en 1997 y ha

Some months ago, I wrote in thIl y a qHace unos meses, escribí en Thil hace unos meses, escribí en este espacio un hexágono en Saturno masiva ( “Tierra, tenemos un hexágono”). Los cientíSome months ago, I wrote in ThIl and a few months ago, I wrote in Thil a few months ago, I wrote in this space a hexagon in massive Saturn (“Earth, we have a hexagon”). Scientists first observed this remarkable celestial formation in the 1980s, in the data that the Voyager spacecraft shipped home. More recently, we have seen – and learned a lot – through images taken by the Cassini spacecraft, which was launched in 1997 and has been in orbit around Saturn for 13 years.

While the hex was a find, we learned much more about Saturn Cassini through only an unexpected form to its north pole. But as I mentioned in the previous column, the small paternal space reaches the end of its fuel. Therefore, their heads at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning a one-year farewell tour of Cassini. It began last orbit around the planet in September. There are some days, carried out the first of the last maneuvers that will continue until September.

The Swansong Cassini is a series of plunged through the famous rings of Saturn, ie between the planet and the rings. The first dive began on April 26, the second on May 2, and there will be a week until September. During each dive, Cassini did what he did with such value for two decades: taking and sending images of Saturn and its surroundings. To give you an idea of what I mean, Cassini has sent about 400,000 photos since its orbit around Saturn in 2004; Almost 1,500 of them are from the first final dives.

The photographs that Cassini has sent are, as expected, spectacular. Ok, not everyone, and I say “spectacular” not because they are very well formed, but in fact because they give us a narrow vision of a world totally foreign to ours. I feel the wonder every time I see these images, every time I think about what we have learned from them.

Like the moons of Saturn. Astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to discover a Saturn in Saturn’s orbit in 1655. It was called Titan. In 1684, Giovanni Domenico Cassini (hence the name) had found four more. When modern Cassini was started in 1997, we knew that Saturn has 18 moons. Very by the niche, yes? However, in the last 20 years, this number has surpassed the 53 confirmed and still new moons are being examined. Once large litter he had suspected, and much of the credit for finding these bodies spinning around Saturn will make this spacecraft.

It’s not just the number of moons.

Hyperion was discovered in 1848, but it was not until 2005 that we realized how strange it is. It is so many crater marks with sharp edges that looks like a giant sponge (take a look at this beautiful image). Tiny polyideus, with a radius of less than 1 km, is a moon “Troy”. This means that it drags a larger moon (Dione, in this case) in its path around Saturn. Daphnis falls through the rings of Saturn, clearly blazing a map on the road, as if driving a ball in a measure of flour. And Enceladus seems to have powerful giant in its south pole, producing columns of crystals of water to hundreds of kilometers in the space. Mention water, of course, and astronomers are excited because this suggests a possibility of life. Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, also reflects life. Cassini has sent a Huygens probe to Titan’s surface in 2005, and was found to be covered with lakes and rivers. Only it is not watercolors as we know them; They are filled with liquid hydrocarbons. This means that life on Titan would be significantly different from everything we know.

Yes, life on any of the moons of Saturn. Courtesy Cassini, we can at least imagine the possibility.

Diving took Cassini within 3 000 km of tops of Saturn’s clouds. If this seems a large gap, remember that given the size of Saturn, its diameter of 120 000 km, 3 000 km is small. And from this proximity, Saturn is like a hulky and pétrissante presence in the viewfinder of Cassini. Some of the blurry images show huge tub in the planet’s atmosphere. It is a storm, but on a scale difficult to understand: it is as big as our Earth. Put our own supercyclones and typhoons in place, no doubt.

When September arrives, Cassini will be ready for his final glory of fire, literally. Recovers NASAuelques mois, j’ai écrit dans cet espace a hexagone massif sur Saturne (“Earth, We Have a Hexagon”). Les scientifiques ont d’abord observed a remarkable formation in the 1980s, with the donations of the Vaisseau spatial Voyager to envoyé à la maison. Plus récemment, nous l’avons vu – et en a appris beaucoup plus – à travers les images prisesficos observaron por primera vez este notable formación celeste en la década de 1980, en los datos que la nave espacial Voyager enviado a casa. Más recientemente, hemos visto – y aprendido mucho – a través de imágenes tomadas por la nave espacial Cassini, que fue lanzado en 1997 y ha

he donations of the Vaisseau spatial Voyager to envoyé à la maison. Plus récemment, nous l’avons vu – et en a appris beaucoup plus – à travers les images prisesficos observaron por primera vez este notable formación celeste en la década de 1980, en los datos que la nave espacial Voyager enviado a casa. Más recientemente, hemos visto – y aprendido mucho – a través de imágenes tomadas por la nave espacial Cassini, que fue lanzado en 1997 y ha

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